You are here: Home - Job Search Preparation - Resume Writer Advice: Separate Job Search Email Address

Resume Writer Advice: Separate Job Search Email Address

resume writer emailWhen you are trying to find employment, no detail is too trivial. Yes, you found a good resume writer. You’ve got your interview clothes together and also began practicing interviewing. But the last thing you want to do is to cost yourself a shot at a good job because of something as seemingly incidental an email address. As a resume writer, I have seen some awfully comical email addresses. As I am sure other resume writers have seen. Yes, the email address KylieLuvsBourbon@hotmail.com is highly unprofessional and will send your resume on a one-way ticket to the trash bin. But there are other reasons to consider creating a separate email address for your job search.

Further Establish Your Brand on your Resume

If your resume writer has done their job properly, then your resume is not only well written, it has also established your brand and value that you bring to the employer. But did you know that you can use your email address to further brand yourself as a professional in the eyes of your resume’s reader? Our friend Kylie in the example above may want to ensure her readers always see her as an accounting professional and not a drunk. So why not an address such as Kylie.CPA@email.com? Whether her resume is nearby or not, anyone emailing her will know she is a CPA simply by looking at her email address. One never passes up an opportunity to establish one’s brand in the eyes of others. You can brand a little further and secure your own domain and URL. Kylie@KyleJonesCPA.com can really make your resume’s reader take notice. The cost is incidental ($12 a year with Google), but really makes an impression.

Avoid Important Emails Being Lost in the Shuffle

If you are like most people, your email is bombarded daily with everything from Groupon and Amazon advertisements, to jokes and pics from family and friends. Not to mention tons of spam. You don’t need for an employer’s emails to get lost amongst all the other emails you receive daily. Even for that contact to be delayed because of the other emails can cost you an opportunity. With a separate email address, you can ensure that anything coming into that account received your immediate attention. With smartphones these days, you can easily set up to receive email alerts on your phone. And while your private emails may not have audible alert, you may want to use audible alerts in this account so there is no delay in receiving them.

Avoid “Dating: Yourself as a Dinosaur on the Resume

Please, please, please tell me you are not still rocking an AOL email address! Well, 1998 called and they would like their email address back. When an employer receives a resume with an email address from a host that is considered outdated, it tends to tell either your age or technological obsolescence. As such, Melvin4418@juno.com will definitely draw the “side-eye” from any employer reviewing that resume. In fact, if your resume writer allowed to you to keep and use such an email address, don’t go back to them.

You Can Terminate It Once the Search is Complete

When you are searching for a job, your email address really gets out there. If you are doing what you are supposed to do, then you are receiving emails from job boards and job agents from many websites. This could be dozens daily. Once your job search is over, you won’t want to go out to all of these websites to remove the email address or terminate the contacts. A separate email address specifically for your job search means that once it is completed, you can deactivate it and turn off the tap. As they say, “no muss, no fuss”.

As any resume writer will tell you, jobs and careers have been lost on a lot less. Give yourself the best chance by sweating the details as much as possible. Don’t let some crazy, wild email address keep you and your resume out in the job search wasteland longer then you need to be. So, RumpShakahShay17664@aol.com, it’s nothing personal, okay?

Back to top