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resume-writer-tipResume writers and career professional are often asked by clients for their opinion on what the next career move should be. But the truth is that this is not a question that can be accurately answered by us. Yes, we can give you a tactical analysis on the types of positions for which you seem to have the best qualifications match. But deciding on your career change should involve numerous factors of which we often are not aware.

At any point in the fork in the road of your career, there are going to be several factors you will need to assess for yourself before a decision can be made. For example, what is your propensity for risk? Not everyone has the disposition “put it on the line” and take gambles. Some opportunities are safer than others. Perhaps not a lot of upside, but they are steady and you know they’ll be there. Then again, some careers are high risk/high reward. Taking such a road can lead you to the penthouse or the poor house once the dust clears. You need to decide which type of person you are. We are all made up of different stuff. Best to know your makeup before you leap.

Another question you can ask yourself is whether you are an office person or enjoy working in the field. You are going to have to get up every day and go “somewhere” on your next job. Are you the type of person who likes routine of going to the same place daily, or is your thing working in the field? There are benefits and detriments to each. When you go into an office every day, you can benefit from the structure and have engagement and social interaction with fellow employees. However, the professional in the field usually has the freedom to control their own hours and they meet new people daily. When you close your eyes, which do you see yourself doing every day?

Other factors to consider include:

  • Do you like the stability of a large company versus the dynamic environment of a smaller one?
  • What is your bank account looking like? Do you have time to pursue this ideal career path, or will the well run dry before you secure it?
  • Which of your skills do you see using every day and which would you rather stay away from?

It is always best to piece together your target like a jigsaw puzzle. Work out the different aspects of what the job should look like for you based upon the totality of your personal makeup and situation, then step back and see what it looks like. Find the job that best matches those parameters and you’re off to the races!

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